Ain’t she a beautiful sight?

There was armored cars, and tanks, and jeeps,
and rigs of every size.

Twenty-eight years after the Jerusalem riots saw the beginning of Operation Nachshon. The Operation was named for the Biblical prince Nachshon, who himself received the name (meaning daring, but it also sounds similar to the word for “stormy sea waves”) during the Israelites exodus from Egypt. According to one text, when the Israelites first reached the Red Sea, the waters did not part before them. As the people argued on the sea’s banks about whom would lead them forward, Nahshon entered the waters. Once he was up to his nose in the water, the sea parted.

Operation Nachshon was conceived to open a path between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem to deliver supplies and ammunition to a besieged Jerusalem, cut off from the coast as the British withdrew from Palestine. The road to Jerusalem led through land surrounded by Arab controlled villages, from which Palestinian militia (under the command of Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni) could ambush Israeli convoys attempting to traverse the route.

The operation started on April 5th with attacks on Arab position and, in the pre-dawn hours on April 6th a convoy arrived in Jerusalem from Tel-Aviv. During the operation, the Israelis successfully captured or reduced more than a dozen villages, and took control of the route. Several more convoys made it into Jerusalem before the end of the operation on April 20th.

Operation Nachshon was also the first time Jewish forces attempted to take and hold territory, as opposed to just conducting raids.

Today also marks a first for A Plague of Frogs. We are delivering, for free download, a PC game depicting the Arab Israeli War of 1948. Click for rules, download link, and other details.

 

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